New Lamy In The Mail!

31 01 2013

Once again, it’s been far too long since I’ve updated here. Actually, due to just “life stuff”, I haven’t done much with my pen hobby at all – other than write with them. But today, an internet purchase came in the mail, so, a good time to update with a review.

First, here’s a link to their US web site, http://www.lamyusa.com . Specifically, This review will focus on the Safari and Vista models. They are basically, the same pen, the only difference being that the Vista is a clear demonstrator, while the Safari’s are colored ABS plastic. I already owned two limited edition Safari’s, an orange and a banana yellow one with black appointments.

As I mentioned earlier, the two models (Safari and Vista) are identical. In fact, a third model, the Al-Star, is also the same pen, but manufactured in multiple colors from aluminum. The pens are 5 1/2″ capped, and apx 6 9/16″ posted. All three of these lines use a universally exchangeable nib system. The nibs are simply friction fit, and slide into their respective pen sections. Nibs are offered from the company in a wide variety of widths, mine are fine and medium. Depending on the color scheme of the particular pen, the nib will be steel and either chrome or a black plating. The nibs on my pens are all very smooth, but do offer a bit of feedback as you write. This is hard for me to accurately describe. I have some pens that I refer to as buttery smooth. These pen nibs are so smooth as to almost feel slick. Almost as if you were writing on ice. I would describe the Lamy’s as “toothy”. They are smooth, but not slick. You “feel” the paper (to a degree) as you write. Thumbs up.

Aesthetically, they’re not for everyone. They definitely have a “modern” look and feel to them. The sections are contoured and molded with 2 flat areas at angles on the otherwise round section. This can take some getting used too, and though I know many may not like it, I have come to really like it. The body of the pens also incorporate 2 flat panels onto the opposing sides of the otherwise round bodies. While I don’t know if it was on purpose, practically this is nice because when you lay the pen down, it won’t role off of a table. There is also a small notched window opening allowing you to see when you’re about to run out of ink. Though on the Vista model (the clear demonstrator model), the notch is useless as you see all the internal workings of the pen. Overall, you get a sleek and modern profile. For old school fountain pen purists, these pens may be too modern in appearance. But boy it’s hard to argue about how they write. Lamy has done a fantastic job with the quality of these pens, especially when you consider their price points. All of the models I’ve mentioned can be purchased online from about $20 to $45 depending on the source and the model chosen. The aluminum Al-Star models command the highest prices. All pens can be filled with either a cartridge or converter  These pens may not be for everyone, but they sure are for me.

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